Anna ‘Delvey’ Sorokin plans to ditch the ‘scammer’ label…with an NFT collection?!

Anna Sorokin wants to rehabilitate her image. So, she’s going to sell…NFTs?!

Sorokin became known as the “socialite scammer” for scamming wealthy individuals in New York City’s social scene out of hundreds of thousands of dollars. Sorokin, going by Anna Delvey, pretended she was a rich German heiress who simply couldn’t access her fortune while overseas. Her scheme eventually fell apart and she was arrested and sentenced to 4 to 12 years in prison. Sorokin was released from prison in April but is currently being held by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement where she is fighting deportation.

And, of course, Sorokin found new levels of fame after Netflix released a series earlier this year about the scammer called Inventing Anna. But, Sorokin isn’t done working for her success and earning her accomplishments. And the current thing she’s working towards is changing how people view her.

In an interview with NBC News, Sorokin says she would like to ditch the “scammer persona” she’s known for. And how is she planning on doing that? Apparently, by launching her own line of non-fungible tokens, better known as NFTs.

SEE ALSO:

‘Inventing Anna’ is as hollow and flashy as its namesake

NFTs are digital assets stored on a blockchain that link to a piece of online media content, usually used to show ownership of said media. 

And while not everyone buying and selling NFTs is a scammer, the space is rife with scams. There have been countless rug pulls, which is when a developer suddenly abandons their crypto or NFT project and runs away with everyone’s money. NFTs often help facilitate art theft, where artists find that their work was stolen and sold as NFTs without their permission. Legitimate NFTs, sold by the original artist, aren’t safe from scams either, with hackers often targeting holders of highly-valued NFTs, which they then steal and resell on the aftermarket. An employee of OpenSea, the largest NFT marketplace, was just arrested for insider trading of…

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