Category Archive : Starlink

Chile permits SpaceX’s Starlink |

By Chris Forrester

October 25, 2021

Chilean telecoms Secretary of State for Telecommunications regulator Subtel has granted permission for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband-by-satellite system to operate in the country.

Local reports say that Starlink has been testing services and connectivity for “some months”.

Subtel is allowing five satellite ground stations to be established in Caldera, Coquimbo, San Clemente, Puerto Saavedra, and Puerto Montt regions.

The nation’s Minister of Transport and Telecommunications, Gloria Hutt, pointed out that “this news reflects the relevance that the country has for the telecommunications industry. For several months, Starlink has shown us its interest in conducting connectivity pilots, which have been successfully carried out in sectors such as Caleta Sierra, Sotomó, and now it is in a position to offer its commercial offer throughout the country. As a Government, we seek to create the conditions so that users can have different connectivity alternatives, with high-speed connections that allow them to access online content anywhere in the country.”

Chile’s Undersecretary of Telecommunications Francisco Moreno was quoted as saying: “We are facing a true milestone in terms of digital inclusion that will provide our users with one more connectivity alternative. From Subtel we promote connectivity by sky, sea, and land, bringing high-speed connections to different areas of our country, allowing students, entrepreneurs, or different productive sectors to be part of the digital revolution …

Furthermore, the interest of companies such as Starlink, Amazon and other low-orbit satellite providers reveals that Chile is an attractive country for investment in telecommunications.”


Read more at advanced-television.com

Starlink in spectrum talks with Vodafone UK to expand service – report

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Starlink Seeks LEO Satellite Spectrum Boost from Vodafone UK

SpaceX’s Starlink service, which delivers ultrafast low latency broadband across the world via a mega constellation of satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), is reportedly one of several operators that may be “ close to striking a deal” to secure some of Vodafone UK’s radio spectrum to help boost their network capacity.

Starlink has already launched around 1,800 LEOs into space (over 1,600 are active) and their initial plan is to deploy a total of 4,425 by 2024. At present, beta customers in the UK typically pay a hefty £89 a month for the service, plus £54 for shipping and £439 ($499) for the kit (dish, router etc.). But for that you can expect unlimited usage, fast latency times of 20-40ms, downloads of c. 50-150Mbps and uploads of c.20Mbps (such figures should improve as the network grows).

NOTE: Starlink’s compact satellites weigh about 260Kg each and orbit the Earth at an altitude of between 540 and 570 kilometres.

The final commercial launch of Starlink is expected anytime now, but meanwhile it’s been reported (Telegraph) that they may be “close” to licensing some radio spectrum from Vodafone UK in order to boost their network links and capacity (this could result in improved performance for customers). A spokesperson for Vodafone said: “Regarding satellite spectrum … we are in talks with multiple operators. We’re close to striking a deal.

Vodafone has previously informed Ofcom that they were open to such talks with satellite operators, with the focus being on their holdings in the 28GHz band. Interestingly, the 28GHz band had previously been indicated as one that could be used for multi-gigabit speed UK mmW (millimeter wave) based 5G mobile or fixed wireless broadband services, but the limited coverage and high cost of deployment in that band has stunted progress.

The regulator likes to see spectrum holdings being properly utilised, so this may be one way for Vodafone to make some money off it, while still retaining control….

Read more at www.ispreview.co.uk

Elon Musk’s Starlink in talks with Vodafone for UK expansion

In the filing, Vodafone said: “Vodafone is a licensee of spectrum in the 28 gigahertz band, using this spectrum extensively for terrestrial fixed links. We understand this bank is of value for gateway links to satellites.

“We are open to approaches from satellite providers who may wish to lease the spectrum.”

An agreement with a telecoms operator could allow Mr Musk to expand more rapidly. His satellite broadband buyers have so far enjoyed fast speeds due to its relatively small customer base, but as numbers ramp up its network could become more congested. Deals with telcos allow satellite operators to connect to fibre internet networks.

He faces competition in the UK for broadband customers from OneWeb. The taxpayer-backed satellite company is currently developing a trial with BT which could see its satellite broadband offered to internet users in rural areas.

Starlink is also thought to be working on ground infrastructure with Arqiva, and at a site on the Isle of Man.

A Vodafone spokesperson said: “Regarding satellite spectrum, we can confirm we are in talks with multiple operators. We’re close to striking a deal.” 

Starlink did not respond to a request for comment.

Read more at www.telegraph.co.uk

SpaceX to double its $100bn valuation if satellite internet takes off

Elon Musk’s SpaceX could double its current $100bn (£72.69bn) valuation in the coming years as it prepares to launch a first-of-its-kind satellite internet business called Starlink that would turn the company into a space telecom.

Reports recently valued SpaceX at $100bn and analysts at Morgan Stanley see Starlink as its biggest revenue driver as SpaceX is expected to bring the programme out of beta later this month and begin a nationwide rollout.

SpaceX has already launched 1,700 low earth orbit satellites to date that are intended to connect rural consumers to broadband internet speeds without the cost of running cables and building towers in more remote areas.

“It is clear to investors and industry observers that SpaceX’s launch cost advantages are being used to accelerate deployment of its low Earth orbit broadband network,” Morgan Stanley analysts wrote in a report reviewed by Capital.com. “As the company achieves pole position in low Earth orbit, which many believe is a winner take most (if not winner take all) arena due to a host of technological and physical factors, the promise of a viable and capable satellite broadband service increases.”

Symbiotic relationship

Until now, the more visible part of SpaceX has been conducting launches for NASA and more recently, low earth orbit flights for private citizens.

Yet, the launch business would only make up 12% of the company’s equity value in Morgan Stanley’s base case scenario or 25% of the equity value if the company reaches the bullish case of a $200bn valuation.

Yet, both businesses will have to work together to unlock the most value. SpaceX intends to launch 42,000 satelites by 2033, which will require the company’s new Starship spacecraft to help deploy 400 satellites per launch.

“We view SpaceX’s launch capabilities and Starlink as inextricably linked whereby improvements in launch capacity/bandwidth (both in frequency and payload per flight) and cost of launch improve the economics…

Read more at capital.com

Starlink Rival cites the Supreme Court to reinforce its position in the FCC debate

Starlink Can Share Spectrum With MVDDS Providers Maintains Michael Dell’s RS Access In a filing that responds to comments made by SpaceX’s David Goldman, RS Access highlights to the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) that the agency’s decision not to indicate new 12GHz rules in a rulemaking proposal agrees with the precedent set by the United States Supreme Court.

Outmanned & Outgunned: Musk’s Starlink Fights 3 Rivals For New Satellites Starlink, it seems, is now arguing that the FCC should have highlighted which rules it might adopt when it provided a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in January. This was revealed in an RS Access filing made earlier this week, with the filer arguing that the agency was not obligated to narrow down any rules when it issued the NPRM.

However, Starlink’s rapid service rollout injected new life into the Commission’s rulemaking procedures. As a result, the agency decided to open the debate and allow parties to submit their comments. With Starlink asking for more certainty, RS Access believes that the FCC should make the rulemaking process as open as possible since any narrowing down will run contrary to the NPRM process, which requires new rules to stem from debate conducted by multiple parties.

This study countered earlier assertions made by the MVDDS camp, claiming that terrestrial and satellite users could not use the 12GHz band and asking the FCC to remove the satellite companies completely from the band. Starlink, RS Access, DISH, and others are submitting their comments and opinions on whether the 12GHz band can be equitably shared between the satellite internet and the MVDDS firms. Both DISH and RS Access argue that the 12Gz spectrum can be shared between the two, with Starlink outlining that its future service plans do not fall in line with the assumptions of a pivotal study submitted by RS Access to the Commission earlier this year.

It goes on to argue that any attempts by the agency to limit down the…

Read more at www.bollyinside.com

MTN, 9mobile Loses 1.37million Data Users, Months After Elon Musk’s Starlink Reveals Nigerian Market Interest ▷ Nigeria news

The data war in the last two months have two losers, and that’s MTN Nigeria and 9mobile, as both telecommunication companies lost 1.37 million internet users between July and August.

Despite the loss, industry report shows that the number of data subscribers increased by 0.34%, rising from 139.38 million users to 139.87 million customers between two months.

Analysis of the data market base shows that Globacom has been gaining ground against the industry leader, MTN Nigeria, gaining the highest subscribers for the period under review.

Logo illustration of MTN Nigeria and 9mobile, as well as Elon Musk, founder of Starlink. Photo: MTN Nigeria/Facebook, 9mobile/Facebook, Elon Muskk/Instagram
Source: UGC

Breakdown of how each companies perform

MTN Nigeria recorded the highest loss when compared to market rival, 9mobile, as 998,827 data users dumped the y’ello network provider in two months.

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It had opened the second quarter with 59.59 million, but ended July with 59.00 million, before regaining its balance to settle at 58.59 million by August ending.

Globacom, which is the second market leader, gained 791,298 data users during the same period MTN lost part of its subscribers. Glo is the only firm that didn’t record a loss in the two months in review.

The data base of the Mike Adenuga firm started July with 37.87 million, then surged to 38.21 million by month end, before rising further to 38.66 million by August.

Airtel, which is the other loser of the period, lost 378,079 data users, as its subscriber base had ended August with 36.61 million, against the 36.05 million NCC reported in July, having began the month with 36.23 million.

9mobile’s subscribers dropped to 5.99 million at the end of August, after losing 115,416 data subscribers from the 6.10 million it opened July with.

Read also

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Elon Musk’s Starlink Progress With Plan…

Read more at www.legit.ng

Former NASA administrator says flooding orbit with satellites could block humanity from space 

More than 3,000 communication satellites are orbiting Earth, but dozens of companies are seeking approval from the Federal Communications Commissions (FCC) to launch thousands more – and the proposals have sparked fears of disastrous collisions in space.

Former NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said in testimony to the Senate Commerce Committee on Thursday: ‘The challenge is that we are beginning an era of large, multi-satellite constellations when FCC rules on debris mitigation apply on a satellite-by-satellite basis.’

‘The U.S. government and governments around the world are failing to properly manage collision risk.’

‘If not remedied, the consequence will be losing access to space entirely, devastating not only satellite communications, but also human spaceflight, national security, weather prediction, disaster relief, climate science, and so much more.’

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Former NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine calls on the US government to mandate better regulations for launching satellites into orbit

The development and use of satellite communications are advancing rapidly and transforming humanity.

SpaceX, founded by Elon Musk, is building a megaconstellation to provide its Starlink internet service to the most remote parts of the world. 

The company has sent more than 1,700 Starlink satellites in orbit, but it hopes to have as many as 42,000 devices circling Earth. 

Amazon’s Kuiper Systems is looking to send 3,326 communication satellites and OneWeb is proposing to build a constellation of 648 devices.

More than 3,000 communication satellites are orbiting Earth, but dozens of companies are seeking approval from the Federal Communications Commissions (FCC) to launch thousands more. SpaceX, founded by Elon Musk, is building a megaconstellation to provide internet service to even the most remote parts of the world

More than 3,000 communication satellites are orbiting Earth, but dozens of companies are seeking approval from the Federal Communications Commissions (FCC) to launch thousands more. SpaceX, founded by Elon Musk, is building a megaconstellation to provide internet service to even the most remote parts of the world

Bridenstine said: ‘The US government and governments around the world are failing to properly manage collision risk.’  SpaceX has sent more than 1,700 Starlink satellites in orbit, but it hopes to have as many as 42,000 devices circling Earth

Bridenstine said: ‘The US government and governments around the world are failing to properly manage collision…

Read more at www.dailymail.co.uk

Starlink Rival Quotes Supreme Court To Bolster Its Position In FCC Debate

Space Exploration Technologies Corporation’s (SpaceX) Starlink satellite service continues its fight to keep current rules for the 12Ghz spectrum band unchanged. These rules govern spectrum sharing between multiple companies, and Starlink uses satellites placed closed over Earth in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to provide its users with internet coverage through dishes. These dishes use the 12GHz band to communicate with the satellites, and Starlink is sparring with DISH Corporation and RS Access, LLC – with the latter aiming to open up the 12GHz band for 5G multi-channel video and data distribution.

Starlink Can Share Spectrum With MVDDS Providers Maintains Michael Dell’s RS Access

In a filing that responds to comments made by SpaceX’s David Goldman, RS Access highlights to the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) that the agency’s decision not to indicate new 12GHz rules in a rulemaking proposal agrees with the precedent set by the United States Supreme Court.

Outmanned & Outgunned: Musk’s Starlink Fights 3 Rivals For New Satellites

Starlink, RS Access, DISH, and others are submitting their comments and opinions on whether the 12GHz band can be equitably shared between the satellite internet and the MVDDS firms. Both DISH and RS Access argue that the 12Gz spectrum can be shared between the two, with Starlink outlining that its future service plans do not fall in line with the assumptions of a pivotal study submitted by RS Access to the Commission earlier this year.

This study countered earlier assertions made by the MVDDS camp, claiming that terrestrial and satellite users could not use the 12GHz band and asking the FCC to remove the satellite companies completely from the band.

However, Starlink’s rapid service rollout injected new life into the Commission’s rulemaking procedures. As a result, the agency decided to open the debate and allow…

Read more at wccftech.com

Challenge for astronomy: Megaconstellations becoming the new light pollution

Satellite megaconstellations are quickly becoming a serious problem to 21st century astronomy akin to urban light pollution, and speedy action is needed as regulations considerably lag behind technology development, a new report finds. 

The executive summary of the report, released last week by the American Astronomical Society (AAS), sums up the conclusions of a dedicated workshop called SATCON 2 that was held in July of this year.

Read more at www.space.com

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